"NOT MY PRESIDENT" alla Casa Bianca

In simultanea con il nuovo libro di Bob Woodward (quello dell'inchiesta sul Watergate di Nixon) dove Trump viene definito dai suoi fedelissimi "idiota" e "squilibrato", arriva sul New York Times un editoriale anonimo di un funzionario importante della Casa Bianca (qualcuno insinua che possa trattarsi addirittura del Vice Presidente Mike Pence) e della cerchia di uomini / donne al servizio di Trump.

Il contenuto dell'articolo è un altro colpo al Presidente, e questa volta proviene dalle stesse stanze in cui le paranoie del "idiota" si manifestano in presa diretta.

 

Dal New York Times, alcuni stralci dell'editoriale anonimo

I Am Part of the Resistance Inside the Trump Administration


I work for the president but like-minded colleagues and I have vowed to thwart parts of his agenda and his worst inclinations.

... To be clear, ours is not the popular “resistance” of the left. We want the administration to succeed and think that many of its policies have already made America safer and more prosperous.

But we believe our first duty is to this country, and the president continues to act in a manner that is detrimental to the health of our republic. ....
The root of the problem is the president’s amorality. Anyone who works with him knows he is not moored to any discernible first principles that guide his decision making.

Don’t get me wrong. There are bright spots that the near-ceaseless negative coverage of the administration fails to capture: effective deregulation, historic tax reform, a more robust military and more.

But these successes have come despite — not because of — the president’s leadership style, which is impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective.

From the White House to executive branch departments and agencies, senior officials will privately admit their daily disbelief at the commander in chief’s comments and actions. Most are working to insulate their operations from his whims.

The erratic behavior would be more concerning if it weren’t for unsung heroes in and around the White House. Some of his aides have been cast as villains by the media. But in private, they have gone to great lengths to keep bad decisions contained to the West Wing, though they are clearly not always successful.

It may be cold comfort in this chaotic era, but Americans should know that there are adults in the room. We fully recognize what is happening. And we are trying to do what’s right even when Donald Trump won’t.

The result is a two-track presidency.

The bigger concern is not what Mr. Trump has done to the presidency but rather what we as a nation have allowed him to do to us. We have sunk low with him and allowed our discourse to be stripped of civility.

Senator John McCain put it best in his farewell letter. All Americans should heed his words and break free of the tribalism trap, with the high aim of uniting through our shared values and love of this great nation.

We may no longer have Senator McCain. But we will always have his example — a lodestar for restoring honor to public life and our national dialogue. Mr. Trump may fear such honorable men, but we should revere them.

There is a quiet resistance within the administration of people choosing to put country first. But the real difference will be made by everyday citizens rising above politics, reaching across the aisle and resolving to shed the labels in favor of a single one: Americans.

The writer is a senior official in the Trump administration.

Commenti chiusi